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What’s in Bloom?

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What’s in bloom in Forsyth County? 

The plants can be viewed in person at these gardens maintained by N.C. Cooperative Extension, Forsyth County Center, with the assistance of Extension Master Gardener℠ Volunteers:

  • Forsyth County Demonstration Garden, located at the Forsyth County Agriculture Building, 1450 Fairchild Rd, Winston-Salem, NC 27105
  • Arboretum and Gardens at Tanglewood Park, 4200 Manor House Circle, Clemmons, NC 27012

If you want to learn more about one of the plants you see here, check out the NC Extension Gardener Plant Toolbox at plants.ces.ncsu.edu.


Week of September 22, 2022

Late-season flowers are beginning to add color to the garden. The leaves will begin to change as the weather cools and plants prepare for winter. We hope you’ll join us for some of our programs this fall, including Forks on Friday and the Adult Education series at the Arboretum at Tanglewood Park.

It is time to overseed your tall fescue lawn. Check out this article for more information on overseeding. We recommend Carolina Lawns as a great guide to lawn care and also the Tall Fescue Lawn Maintenance Calendar.

Thanks to Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Alyssa Magalski for helping compile this week’s what’s in bloom photos and plant information.


Pineapple sage (Salvia elegans) is a hummingbird favorite, blooming in late summer to early fall when food sources may be less abundant. The foliage of this plant smells of pineapple when the leaves are crushed.

Pineapple sage flower

Pineapple sage is blooming now at the Arboretum at Tanglewood Park.

Goldenrod (Solidago rugosa) is a native perennial plant that tends to form clumps in the garden. This plant features 2-5 foot stems that have radiating light yellow flowers at the tips. In recent times goldenrods have been blamed for hay fever, but its irritating symptoms are actually caused by ragweed (Ambrosia species), whose pollen is airborne when goldenrod is in flower.

Goldenrod

Goldenrod is blooming now at the Demonstration Garden and at the Arboretum at Tanglewood Park.

Egyptian starcluster or pentas (Pentas lanceolata) is a popular bedding plant with moderate to high drought tolerance. This plant is seldom damaged by deer. Hummingbirds are attracted to the red variety.

Pentas flowers

Pentas are blooming now at the Demonstration Garden.

Despite its succulent appearance, sedum or stonecrop (Hylotelephium) is a perennial plant in our area. This plant requires full sun and well-drained soil. It can suffer in overly-moist or fertile soils. These plants attract butterflies and other pollinators and are known for good heat and drought tolerance.

Sedum

Sedum is blooming now at the Demonstration Garden and at the Arboretum at Tanglewood Park.

Sedum with butterflies

Sedum is blooming now at the Demonstration Garden and at the Arboretum at Tanglewood Park.

Sedum

Sedum is blooming now at the Demonstration Garden and at the Arboretum at Tanglewood Park.

Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) is closely related to cotton. Each yellow flower is followed by an edible okra pod. The pods are best when they are smaller (typically under 3 inches in length) and can require daily harvesting during the hotter months. This is a beautiful vegetable to try in your summer garden.

Okra flowers

Okra is now blooming at the Demonstration Garden.

African marigolds (Tagetes erecta) are actually native to Mexico. Marigolds are grown in our area as a summer annual plant and will die at frost. These plants tolerate heat and add season-long color to the summer garden.

orange marigolds

Marigolds are blooming now at the Demonstration Garden and at the Arboretum at Tanglewood Park.

yellow marigolds

Marigolds are blooming now at the Demonstration Garden and at the Arboretum at Tanglewood Park.

Turtlehead (Chelone lyonii) is a native perennial that tends to grow in clumps. It thrives in moist soils and is a good choice for a rain garden. You can often find bees and hummingbirds visiting the flowers when this plant is blooming.

Turtlehead

Turtlehead is now blooming at the Arboretum and at the Demonstration Garden.

Japanese anemone (Anemone xhybrida) is now blooming in our area. This perennial features uniquely shaped leaves and flowers that grow on tall stems. Grow this plant in the shade, but know that it will spread when planted in a suitable place.

Japanese anemone flower

Japanese anemone is blooming now at the Arboretum at Tanglewood Park.

Leadwort (Ceratostigma plumbaginoides) is a ground cover that will spread when in the right spot in your garden. This plant has unique blue flowers and the foliage will develop fall color later in the season. Grow this perennial in full or part sun.

Leadwort flowers

Leadwort is blooming now in the Demonstration Garden.

Leadwort flowers

Leadwort is blooming now in the Demonstration Garden.

Mature Begonia plants range in size from a few inches high to over 12 inches high, and the flowers, foliage colors, and sizes are very diverse. The plant has a medium growth rate and is a moderate bloomer, producing large clusters of small, hairy, pink flowers on sturdy, thin, erect stems from summer to fall. Most varieties of begonia are annuals in our area; they are one of the few annual plants that flower in the shade.

begonia in pot

Begonias are blooming now at the Arboretum at Tanglewood Park and at the Demonstration Garden

Begonia

Begonias are blooming now at the Arboretum at Tanglewood Park and at the Demonstration Garden.

Zinnia (Zinnia elegans) is an annual flower that is easy to grow from seed. The blooms come in a variety of colors and offer long-lasting color for a sunny spot in your garden. Zinnias are growing at both the Arboretum at Tanglewood Park and at the Demonstration Garden. Powdery mildew is often a problem with zinnias in the late summer and fall, read more about how to handle powdery mildew here.

Zinnia

Zinnia is blooming now at the Arboretum at Tanglewood Park and at the Demonstration Garden.

Zinnia flower with butterfly

Zinnias are blooming now at the Demonstration Garden and at the Arboretum at Tanglewood Park.

Lantana camara is typically considered an annual, though some varieties will grow as perennials in our area. The long lasting color is attractive in a sunny spot in your garden. Lantana comes in a wide variety of colors, including yellow, orange, pink, and red.

Lantana

Lantana is now blooming at the Demonstration Garden and the Arboretum.

Lantana

Lantana is now blooming at the Arboretum at Tanglewood Park and at the Forsyth County Demonstration Garden.

Annual vinca (Catharanthus roseus) is a good choice for adding color to the garden in the summer. This plant is an annual and will die at the first frost in the fall.

Annual vinca

Annual vinca is now blooming at the Arboretum at Tanglewood Park.

For more photos:

Click here for the folder of archived “what’s in bloom” photos.